Photo 27 Sep 52 notes 
Head of Odin
A 9th century pendant from Bridlington, East Yorkshire, England. Possibly depicting the god Odin (based on museum notes).
From the collection of the British Museum, London, England.

Head of Odin

A 9th century pendant from Bridlington, East Yorkshire, England.

Possibly depicting the god Odin (based on museum notes).

From the collection of the British Museum, London, England.

Photo 27 Sep 14 notes 
Stones for Hnefatafl
Historisk Museum, Oslo, Norway
Photo by mararie

Stones for Hnefatafl

Historisk Museum, Oslo, Norway

Photo by mararie

Photo 27 Sep 16 notes 
Wooden statue of Odin
Historisk Museum, Oslo, Norway
Photo by mararie

Wooden statue of Odin

Historisk Museum, Oslo, Norway

Photo by mararie

Photo 27 Sep 160 notes 
Urnes Stave Church / Urnes stavkyrkje in Norway
Detail Carvings
build c1132

Urnes Stave Church / Urnes stavkyrkje in Norway

Detail Carvings

build c1132

Photo 27 Sep 576 notes 
Urnes Stave Church / Urnes stavkyrkje in Norway
Detail Carvings
build c1132

Urnes Stave Church / Urnes stavkyrkje in Norway

Detail Carvings

build c1132

Photo 27 Sep 49 notes 
Urnes Stave Church / Urnes stavkyrkje in Norway, the oldest stave church, now UNESCO
The name-giver for the Urnes Style of the Vikings.
build c.1132

Urnes Stave Church / Urnes stavkyrkje in Norway, the oldest stave church, now UNESCO

The name-giver for the Urnes Style of the Vikings.

build c.1132

Photo 17 Sep 30 notes 
Dynna Stone in Ringerike Style
"Gunnvor made a bridge, Thyrdrik’s daughter, in memory of Astrid, her daughter. She was the handiest maiden in Hadeland."
Historisk Museum, Oslo, Norway
Photo by mararie

Dynna Stone in Ringerike Style

"Gunnvor made a bridge, Thyrdrik’s daughter, in memory of Astrid, her daughter. She was the handiest maiden in Hadeland."

Historisk Museum, Oslo, Norway

Photo by mararie

Photo 17 Sep 70 notes 
Alstad Stone in Ringerike Style
“Jorunn put up this stone in memory of …, her husband, and fetched [it] from pingerike, from Ulvoy. may the picture stone honour [?] them both”
Historisk Museum, Oslo, Norway
Photo by mararie

Alstad Stone in Ringerike Style

“Jorunn put up this stone in memory of …, her husband, and fetched [it] from pingerike, from Ulvoy. may the picture stone honour [?] them both”

Historisk Museum, Oslo, Norway

Photo by mararie

Video 17 Sep 335 notes

This Viking rune-stone was found in the churchyard of St Paul’s Cathedral, London in 1852. The decoration on the face is in the Ringerike style which is dated to c. A.D. 980 - 1070. The runes are cut in two lines on the stone. The text reads: “Ginna and Toki had this stone set up.” Vestiges of paint were found on the stone.

Photo 17 Sep 115 notes 

The Ringerike Style (c. AD 980 – 1070)
The Ringerike style grew out of the Mammen style during the first half of the 11th century. The style emerged at a time when the custom of erecting stone monuments was becoming more common and the style is named after a series of richly carved stones in the Ringerike district of Norway.
One can see that the Ringerike style has developed from the Mammen style, although there are a number of significant differences: the animals are thinner and more curvaceous; their bodies are no longer decorated inside; the eyes are almond-shaped instead of round; and the tendrils get thinner and longer. A fine grave-slab decorated in the Ringerike style was found in the churchyard of St Paul’s Cathedral, London.
Viking ship Weather Vane with Eagle motif, Ringerike style, 11th Century CE. Heggen, Norway

The Ringerike Style (c. AD 980 – 1070)

The Ringerike style grew out of the Mammen style during the first half of the 11th century. The style emerged at a time when the custom of erecting stone monuments was becoming more common and the style is named after a series of richly carved stones in the Ringerike district of Norway.

One can see that the Ringerike style has developed from the Mammen style, although there are a number of significant differences: the animals are thinner and more curvaceous; their bodies are no longer decorated inside; the eyes are almond-shaped instead of round; and the tendrils get thinner and longer. A fine grave-slab decorated in the Ringerike style was found in the churchyard of St Paul’s Cathedral, London.

Viking ship Weather Vane with Eagle motif, Ringerike style, 11th Century CE. Heggen, Norway
Photo 14 Sep 14 notes 
Nature is God

Nature is God

Photo 13 Sep 77 notes 
The Cammin Casket 
Elk ivory and gilt bronze with nailed and engraved trim; Mammen style of decoration (10th-11thC Denmark)
Nationalmuseet Denmark

The Cammin Casket

Elk ivory and gilt bronze with nailed and engraved trim; Mammen style of decoration (10th-11thC Denmark)

Nationalmuseet Denmark

Photo 13 Sep 409 notes 
Mammen Style of Viking ArtThe Mammen style (c.960-1020) overlaps both in time and appearance with the Jellinge but shows a more emphatic form on the same theme. Animals have fuller bodies instead of ribbons, spirals on the hips, and often a total covering of billets: the new feature is plant-like tendrils, derived ultimately from Carolingian acanthus.
Two famous caskets were made in the Mammen style, known as the Bamberg and Cammin caskets. 
image: The Bamberg casket

Mammen Style of Viking Art

The Mammen style (c.960-1020) overlaps both in time and appearance with the Jellinge but shows a more emphatic form on the same theme. Animals have fuller bodies instead of ribbons, spirals on the hips, and often a total covering of billets: the new feature is plant-like tendrils, derived ultimately from Carolingian acanthus.

Two famous caskets were made in the Mammen style, known as the Bamberg and Cammin caskets. 

image: The Bamberg casket

Photo 13 Sep 253 notes 
Mammen style Viking button
Anglo-Scandinavian design in the ‘Mammen Style’
The design shows a man bound by two snakes.
From the collection of the British Museum, London, England.

Mammen style Viking button

Anglo-Scandinavian design in the ‘Mammen Style’

The design shows a man bound by two snakes.

From the collection of the British Museum, London, England.

Photo 13 Sep 83 notes 
The Mammen Style (c. 950 – 1030)
Silver-inlaid axehead in the Mammen style, AD 900s. Bjerringhoj, Mammen, Jutland, Denmark. Photo: The National Museum of Denmark


The Mammen style grew out of the Jellinge style, and it can sometimes be difficult to tell them apart. The name comes from a small, decorated axe-head from a grave in Mammen, Denmark. Recent dendrochronological dating has suggested a date of c. 970 for the grave.
The Axe is inlaid with silver wires: on one side is a foliate pattern; on the other side (shown here) is a bird. The body of the bird is thicker than the ribbon-like bodies of the Jellinge style animals: it is decorated with dots, and there is a large spiral hip. The wings and tail are drawn into long, curving tendrils. At the top of the axe is a human face mask with round eyes, a large nose and a spiral beard.

The Mammen Style (c. 950 – 1030)

Silver-inlaid axehead in the Mammen style, AD 900s. Bjerringhoj, Mammen, Jutland, Denmark. Photo: The National Museum of Denmark

The Mammen style grew out of the Jellinge style, and it can sometimes be difficult to tell them apart. The name comes from a small, decorated axe-head from a grave in Mammen, Denmark. Recent dendrochronological dating has suggested a date of c. 970 for the grave.

The Axe is inlaid with silver wires: on one side is a foliate pattern; on the other side (shown here) is a bird. The body of the bird is thicker than the ribbon-like bodies of the Jellinge style animals: it is decorated with dots, and there is a large spiral hip. The wings and tail are drawn into long, curving tendrils. At the top of the axe is a human face mask with round eyes, a large nose and a spiral beard.


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