Photo 30 Aug 22 notes 
Artefacts from “The Cuerdale hoard”
Found at Cuerdale, Lancashire, England Viking, buried between about AD 905–910
The largest Viking silver hoard known from western Europe
British Museum

Artefacts from “The Cuerdale hoard”

Found at Cuerdale, Lancashire, England
Viking, buried between about AD 905–910

The largest Viking silver hoard known from western Europe

British Museum

Photo 30 Aug 105 notes 

The Cuerdale hoard
Found at Cuerdale, Lancashire, England Viking, buried between about AD 905–910
The largest Viking silver hoard known from Western Europe
British Museum

The Cuerdale hoard

Found at Cuerdale, Lancashire, England
Viking, buried between about AD 905–910

The largest Viking silver hoard known from Western Europe

British Museum

Photo 30 Aug 19 notes 
A reconstruction of Gaut’s Interlace in fiber. Gaut’s Interlace is a Viking era motif that appears in two places in the United Kingdom: Gaut’s Cross on the Isle of Man and the Gosforth Cross in Cumbria. This attractive motif survives only in the British Isles. From Lise Broer, California.

A reconstruction of Gaut’s Interlace in fiber. Gaut’s Interlace is a Viking era motif that appears in two places in the United Kingdom: Gaut’s Cross on the Isle of Man and the Gosforth Cross in Cumbria. This attractive motif survives only in the British Isles. From Lise Broer, California.

Photo 30 Aug 13 notes 
Example for Gaut’s Interlace
Gauts cross
Kirk Michael, Isle of Man. 9-10th century

Example for Gaut’s Interlace

Gauts cross

Kirk Michael, Isle of Man. 9-10th century

Photo 30 Aug 54 notes 
Silver pendant, 10th
Production in Scandinavia, Findspot in England, Norfolk, Little Snoring
The Borre Style / Gauts Interlace (c. AD 840 – 970)
The Borre style takes its name from another set of bronze bridle-mounts from a ship burial at Borre in Vestfold, Norway. This style continues the use of the “gripping beast” motif, but with a new development – the ribbon shaped body is beneath a rather triangular head with protruding ears. This can be seen in this example of a silver-gilt pendant from a hoard found in Vårby in Sweden. 
In Britain, an insular form of the Borre Style, known as “Gaut’s Interlace” developed. It takes its name from Gaut’s Cross (Kirk Michael 101) in the Isle of Man.

Silver pendant, 10th

Production in Scandinavia, Findspot in England, Norfolk, Little Snoring

The Borre Style / Gauts Interlace (c. AD 840 – 970)

The Borre style takes its name from another set of bronze bridle-mounts from a ship burial at Borre in Vestfold, Norway. This style continues the use of the “gripping beast” motif, but with a new development – the ribbon shaped body is beneath a rather triangular head with protruding ears. This can be seen in this example of a silver-gilt pendant from a hoard found in Vårby in Sweden.

In Britain, an insular form of the Borre Style, known as “Gaut’s Interlace” developed. It takes its name from Gaut’s Cross (Kirk Michael 101) in the Isle of Man.



Photo 30 Aug 20 notes 
Animal head from the Ship Mound in Borre, Norway
Example for the Viking Borre Style

Animal head from the Ship Mound in Borre, Norway

Example for the Viking Borre Style

Photo 30 Aug 13 notes 
Example for the Viking Borre Style
Fragments of the hilt of a Viking Period display sword. It’s cast in bronze with rich Borre Style decoration (c. AD 850-1000) and silver wire frills. Though settled by the Norsemen from about AD 800 onward

Example for the Viking Borre Style

Fragments of the hilt of a Viking Period display sword. It’s cast in bronze with rich Borre Style decoration (c. AD 850-1000) and silver wire frills. Though settled by the Norsemen from about AD 800 onward

Photo 30 Aug 34 notes 
The Borre Style / Gauts Interlace (c. AD 840 – 970) of the Vikings

This Viking art style was popular from the later ninth to mid-tenth centuries in areas settled by the Vikings - from Dublin and York to Novgorod in Russia. Metalwork decorated in this style, which takes its name from a find at Borre, in Vestfold, Norway, was still being buried in hoards of the late tenth century. More or less symmetrical animals with full-face, cat-like, triangular heads, large round eyes and prominent ears are typical of the style. They are often shown with arched, ribbon bodies, their paws gripping their own necks and limbs and surrounding frames, like the so-called Gripping Beast of earlier styles. Plaited knots and ring-chain patterns are also common, the ridges of designs in metalwork are often nicked to imitate the filigree wire used on the finest pieces. Sometimes plant motifs were adopted from Carolingian art.

The Borre Style / Gauts Interlace (c. AD 840 – 970) of the Vikings

This Viking art style was popular from the later ninth to mid-tenth centuries in areas settled by the Vikings - from Dublin and York to Novgorod in Russia. Metalwork decorated in this style, which takes its name from a find at Borre, in Vestfold, Norway, was still being buried in hoards of the late tenth century. More or less symmetrical animals with full-face, cat-like, triangular heads, large round eyes and prominent ears are typical of the style. They are often shown with arched, ribbon bodies, their paws gripping their own necks and limbs and surrounding frames, like the so-called Gripping Beast of earlier styles. Plaited knots and ring-chain patterns are also common, the ridges of designs in metalwork are often nicked to imitate the filigree wire used on the finest pieces. Sometimes plant motifs were adopted from Carolingian art.

Photo 23 Aug 815 notes 
Celtic Beauty

Celtic Beauty

(Source: etrezomp-ni--kelted)

Photo 23 Aug 2,987 notes
Photo 20 Aug 261 notes 
Details of the Oseberg wagon

Details of the Oseberg wagon

Video 20 Aug 7 notes

Photo 20 Aug 33 notes 
Examples for the Viking “Broa/Oseberg Style” (c. AD 780-850)
The wagon from the Oseberg find was old even before it was laid in the tomb. Likely it made ​​before 800 In the Oseberg burial it was found a woven tapestry. Some of the motifs woven into the carpet are horses that pull carriages. It looks like a parade with people wagons and horses. The wagon is today exhibited at Viking Ship Museum in Oslo.

Examples for the Viking “Broa/Oseberg Style” (c. AD 780-850)

The wagon from the Oseberg find was old even before it was laid in the tomb. Likely it made ​​before 800 In the Oseberg burial it was found a woven tapestry. Some of the motifs woven into the carpet are horses that pull carriages. It looks like a parade with people wagons and horses. The wagon is today exhibited at Viking Ship Museum in Oslo.

Photo 18 Aug 53 notes 
Examples for the Viking “Broa/Oseberg Style” (c. AD 780-850)

Animal-head post found in the Oseberg vikingship, seen in the Viking Ship Museum, Oslo, Norway
Examples for the Viking “Broa/Oseberg Style” (c. AD 780-850)
Animal-head post found in the Oseberg vikingship, seen in the Viking Ship Museum, Oslo, Norway
Video 18 Aug 1,313 notes

Examples for the Viking “Broa/Oseberg Style” (c. AD 780-850)

Photo 1: The Oseberg Viking Ship at the Viking Ship Museum, Oslo

Photo 2: Detail from the Oseberg ship

Photo 3: Detail from the back bow of the Oseberg ship

Osebergskipet Vikingskipmuseet, Oslo


Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.