Video 1 Aug 6 notes

Men’s hairstyles

The Viking Age peoples had a wide variety of hairstyles, just as we do today.

Top: Carved Head on Sledge, Oseberg Ship Burial, late 9th cent. His chin is clean-shaven and he wears a moustache.

Down left: Carved Head on Sledge, Oseberg Ship Burial, late 9th cent. A man wearing chainmail and a close-fitting helm or coif. His neatly-trimmed beard and mustache are finely detailed.

Down right: Carved Head on Antler Handle.This Viking’s beard is well-groomed, and his moustaches seem to be waxed to points in an upward curve.

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Photo 1 Aug 4 notes 
A Viking ear pick
The Vikings used ear picks to clean out their ears, in a similar way to how we use cotton buds today.
National Museum of Denmark
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A Viking ear pick

The Vikings used ear picks to clean out their ears, in a similar way to how we use cotton buds today.

National Museum of Denmark

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Photo 1 Aug 10 notes 
Viking woman’s Bronze tool brooch with attached tweezers, Gotland
Historika Museet, Stockholm
"Other tools for personal grooming included tweezers and ear picks. Tweezers were frequently carried by women on a chain from their brooches."
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Viking woman’s Bronze tool brooch with attached tweezers, Gotland

Historika Museet, Stockholm

"Other tools for personal grooming included tweezers and ear picks. Tweezers were frequently carried by women on a chain from their brooches."

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Photo 1 Aug 7 notes 

Double-Sided Comb
Late Anglo-Saxon, 10th/11th century
found in Jorvik (Coppergate,York) site
© York Archaeological Trust 2005
"Grave-finds show a slight difference between men’s comb and women’s comb usage. Women’s graves rarely include combs with comb cases, while men’s graves that include combs almost always do."

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Double-Sided Comb

Late Anglo-Saxon, 10th/11th century

found in Jorvik (Coppergate,York) site

© York Archaeological Trust 2005

"Grave-finds show a slight difference between men’s comb and women’s comb usage. Women’s graves rarely include combs with comb cases, while men’s graves that include combs almost always do."

(Source: BBC)

Photo 1 Aug 10 notes 
One-Piece Walrus Ivory Comb
Double-edged, fine teeth on one side, coarse on the other. Carved with pair of cat-like animals and a serpent. Late Anglo-Saxon, 10th/11th century.
British Museum
"Perhaps the most important grooming tool was the comb, which was used not only to smooth and order the hair, but also to help remove any dirt or vermin. Combs were in everyday use at every level of society. Combs were used as a part of the hair washing process, being used to comb through the wet hair during washing. Some scholars believe that the widespread use of combs throughout the ancient world was due to their utility in controlling lice and nits."
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One-Piece Walrus Ivory Comb

Double-edged, fine teeth on one side, coarse on the other. Carved with pair of cat-like animals and a serpent. Late Anglo-Saxon, 10th/11th century.

British Museum

"Perhaps the most important grooming tool was the comb, which was used not only to smooth and order the hair, but also to help remove any dirt or vermin. Combs were in everyday use at every level of society. Combs were used as a part of the hair washing process, being used to comb through the wet hair during washing. Some scholars believe that the widespread use of combs throughout the ancient world was due to their utility in controlling lice and nits."

Read more…

Text 1 Aug 6 notes Personal Grooming in the Viking Age

Although the popular image of the people of the Viking Age is one of wild-haired, dirty savages, this is a false perception. In reality, the Vikings took care with their personal grooming, bathing, and hairstyling.

It is reported in the chronicle attributed to John of Wallingford that the Danes combing their hair every day, bathing every Saturday and regularly changing their clothes.

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Photo 28 Jul 5 notes 
Pendant Bronze
The pendant is shaped as a fire-steel with two birds facing each other in the middle. Björkö, Adelsö Uppland, Sweden.
The Swedish History Museum, Stockholm

Pendant Bronze

The pendant is shaped as a fire-steel with two birds facing each other in the middle. Björkö, Adelsö Uppland, Sweden.

The Swedish History Museum, Stockholm

Photo 28 Jul 83 notes 

Anglo-Saxon brooch 6-7c
British Museum
via Kotomi

Anglo-Saxon brooch 6-7c

British Museum

via Kotomi

Photo 28 Jul 8 notes 
Anglo-Saxon Kentish brooch 6c
British Museum
via Kotomi

Anglo-Saxon Kentish brooch 6c

British Museum

via Kotomi

Photo 28 Jul 11 notes 
Anglo-Saxon necklace
British Museum
via Kotomi

Anglo-Saxon necklace

British Museum

via Kotomi

Photo 27 Jul 20 notes
Photo 27 Jul 269 notes 
Hairstyle reconstruction of the Ellingkvinded bog body, which approximates the braid found on Viking Age Valkyrie pendants

Hairstyle reconstruction of the Ellingkvinded bog body, which approximates the braid found on Viking Age Valkyrie pendants

(Source: pinterest.com)

Photo 27 Jul 6 notes 
Early Scandinavian disc-on-bow brooch 6-7c
British Museum
via Kotomi

Early Scandinavian disc-on-bow brooch 6-7c

British Museum

via Kotomi

Photo 27 Jul 17 notes Anglo-Saxon belt fittings 6-7c
via Kotomi

Anglo-Saxon belt fittings 6-7c

via Kotomi

Photo 24 Jul 36 notes 
Cranium, male
In the upper jaw, horizontally filed furrows on the upper frontal part of the teeth crowns show that deliberate dental modifications were made
Grave find, Skolgården, Resmo, Öland, Sweden.
The Swedish History Museum, Stockholm

Cranium, male

In the upper jaw, horizontally filed furrows on the upper frontal part of the teeth crowns show that deliberate dental modifications were made

Grave find, Skolgården, Resmo, Öland, Sweden.

The Swedish History Museum, Stockholm


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